Wednesday, February 20, 2008

Max Lucado's Trinity


Recently, I've been teaching a class covering various periods in church history. This past week, I covered the Council of Nicea, so I've been reading a lot on the Trinity and the deity of Christ. Truly brilliant was B.B. Warfield's "The Biblical Doctrine of the Trinity (The Works of B.B. Warfield vol. II). Also very helpful was Dr. White's book, The Forgotten Trinity (as well as his article, "What Really Happened at Nicea?").

On the other hand, while looking around in the library of my church, I came across Max Lucado's book, No Wonder They Call Him The Savior. I had completely forgotten about this book. I had read it some years back, probably ten years ago. My copy, wherever it is, is penciled up with my own notes, as most of my books are (I tend to interact with the texts I read). There was one particular point in this book that I've never forgotten. So, I thumbed through the copy from the library. For a moment, I wondered if the text really said what I had remembered. It had been at least ten years since I had read it. Sure enough, it was there.

Commenting on, "My God, my God, why have You forsaken Me?" (Matthew 27:46), Lucado states:

"The despair is darker than the sky. The two who have been one are now two. Jesus, who had been with God for eternity, is now alone. The Christ, who was an expression of God, is abandoned. The Trinity is dismantled. The Godhead is disjointed. The unity is dissolved" (p. 47).

Contrary to Max Lucado, the Trinity has never been dismantled, and the Godhead has never been disjointed. The persons of the Trinity are coeternal. The word "coeternal" would cease to describe the Trinity if Lucado is right.

I know many struggle with Matthew 27:46, but one thing should be perfectly clear. If Jesus intended by his words to state that "the unity is dissolved," one has to explain why Luke records Jesus then saying, "Father, into your hands I commit my spirit" (Luke 23:46). If such separation between the Godhead had taken place, certainly Jesus would not have said these words.

10 comments:

graceb4me said...

....thank you , thank you, thank you and thank you for posting this. It needs to be said and exposed. :)

gracey

Lvka said...

In Grave with the body, in Hell with the soul, and -as a God- in Heaven with the Thief, and on the Throne You were seated, oh Christ, with the Father and the Spirit, filling everything, You Who are uncontained.

Rhology said...

Lucado is theology like The Message is Scripture.

GeneMBridges said...

In Grave with the body, in Hell with the soul, and -as a God- in Heaven with the Thief, and on the Throne You were seated, oh Christ, with the Father and the Spirit, filling everything, You Who are uncontained.

This brings up an interesting issue. The descent into hell is part of the Apostle's Creed, but it is not part of any creed that would be truly binding from either the Catholic or Protestant rules of faith. It's a late addition to the AC, and it has little exegetical support. These days, it is largely denied.

Lvka said...

Glad to have captured Your interest, my sweet, innocent, little, naive and unsuspecting victim. >:) Here's another taste of the forbidden fruit:

On earth You came, so that You might save Adam, and -not being able to find him- You've descended into those that lay below, even unto the depths of Hell You've searched after him, oh Master.

Adam feared, as God was walking then through Paradise, yet now he's glad that You came to Hell: for then he fell, yet now he's risen
.

And -to directly answer Max Lucado- here's another one:

In the Grave You've set down, but form the Father's bossom You've never been estranged, oh my Christ. This thing is strange and uncommon
.

PVCMA Blog said...

So...given that our 'death' includes both spiritual and physical, in what way did Jesus take on our spiritual death on the cross...?

PVCMA Blog said...

So...given that our 'death' includes both spiritual and physical, in what way did Jesus take on our spiritual death on the cross...?

mlculwell said...

This is why the doctrine of the trinity is so ridiculous! Max Lucado, although wrong like you yourself, in using the term "trinity" and it's man-made ideas forces an un-scriptural doctrine of a fictitious doctrine upon God's word because of historical figures who did so themselves, you thinking them right wallow in the same folly instead of believing scripture, but Lucado's little quote is more scriptural and reveals your sin. Lucado sees the real humanity of the son that had to die,(A hybrid mix neither man nor God, can redeem mankind) as he is not our kindred redeemer. You insert a hybrid mixture and reveal your polytheism. by trying to expose Lucado you have exposed yourself as a false teacher.

Anyone wanting to debate me on this issue can come here:

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Trinity_vs_Oneness_Debate/

mlculwell said...

Jesus saying: "father into thy Hand I commend my spirit" is not Jesus commending "another divine spirit" as that is blatant polytheism. Jesus is giving up his human spirit(James 2:26) But since you do not believe Jesus was a real man but some hybrid mix you have a real problem with scripture.

mlculwell said...

debate On Oneness versus Trinity

Limey Bob


http://www.mediafire.com/?8ydnuutfcpafbj6