Wednesday, January 19, 2011

Quick Update

For those of you wondering (and hoping) when my "Luther, Exposing the Myth" project will be finished, I probably have another fifteen or so quotes to go. What I've done so far can be found here: "Luther, Exposing the Myth": a Response. I realize these posts are yawners in many respects. These posts aren't even primarily about Luther. They are primarily about how poor some Roman Catholics are at history. The same religion that says "to be deep in history is to cease being Protestant" is quite inept at Reformation history. Each of the quotes has history. It's not just the author of "Luther, Exposing the Myth" that cannot read quotes in context. Simply Google search the quotes and you'll find a whole host of Romanists who haven't got a clue. I'm very appreciative of my co-bloggers. Since they post on other subjects, this freed me up to do a project like this.

I've actually taken some time off from Romanism these past few months. I haven't even been listening to Catholic Answers (I think I've heard just about every "answer" at this point). I'm also involved with taking seminary classes. That, along with a job, family, and church responsibilities leaves sparse blogging play time. This also why I haven't posted too much over at aomin, and kept up with Iron Sharpens Iron.

For those of you who read this blog regularly, thank you. Without the help of my co-bloggers, I probably wouldn't have kept it going.

17 comments:

John Bugay said...

James, I haven't read all of the series, but I've read enough to have gotten the sense of it. It's just amazing that an institution like Rome relies on such a combination of dissimulation and outright lies for its own survival.

I could live without the "death mask" picture, but I guess it makes the series ;-)

Andrew said...

I like the word "dissimulation".

Tim Enloe said...

Yes, indeed, thank you for the posts. Like John, I haven't read them all, but I have always appreciated your commitment to digging deep into these sources in order to set the record straight about Luther.

Your posts don't just show how sloppily many RCs handle the Reformation. They also show how far we Protestants have to go in educating our own people. How many, I wonder, have bought the RC pop apologetics slurs about Luther (and the Reformation generally) and upended their entire spiritual and emotional and intellectual lives - and all for such a mess of pottage as the examinations of these quotes continually proves?

I have a lot of constructive things to say about the Reformation, but no time to keep up with my own blog these days. That being the case, and since this series is largely negative (by way of deconstructing bad arguments), I wonder if you or someone else here could start a positive series about the Reformation? Examine its historical and philosophical and cultural contexts, its methods, goals, and mutations?

We need to positively and constructively educate our people better, or they'll keep buying the superficial swill you've been so masterfully exposing.

John Bugay said...

Tim, one of my hopes was to start that very thing, having first set some of the background of the Roman church as context. But, you know, there are distractions, etc....

Andrew, I had to look it up before I posted it :-D

Andrew said...

John, it's a very KJVish word. I suppose Turretinfan would approve of the word as well.

John Bugay said...

Andrew, LOL, invoking T-fan on me -- he is one of the Lord's best works.

Matthew D. Schultz said...

Tim,

I think your suggestion is excellent. I had planned to do a biographical sketch of Bellarmine, but positive posts detailing the Reformation and its distinctive contributions strike me as a more valuable use of time.

James Swan said...

I could live without the "death mask" picture, but I guess it makes the series ;-)

John,

It's an anti-marketing ploy. I'm very good at eliminating readers.

James Swan said...

I wonder if you or someone else here could start a positive series about the Reformation?

A good idea. Thanks.

Tim Enloe said...

I only wish I had time to write about these things myself. For instance, I've been working on a series on the Reformers' views concerning Natural Law for about a year, but work and family have made it impossible to finish. I have tons of ideas for how to show the connections of the Renaissance with the Reformation (an extremely important topic given the astonishingly unreasonable Catholic apologist rhetoric about the "novelty" of the Reformation approach to Scripture and theology), but again, no time to seriously work on any of it.

I don't mean this in the snse that nobody is doing anything, because obviously that's not true. Still, we need more things like this, and much more dissemination of them. I've lost count of the number of laymen - and even pastors - whom I've heard asking for substantial material on subjects like these.

We're being systematically and vigorously targeted by this grossly superficial convert-making industry, but for all the good debates and blog articles and such (which I am in no way demeaning), we always seem to be behind the curve, so to speak, in educating the great mass of our people.

Carrie said...

Thanks for the update, James, since you never answer my emails :)

James Swan said...

Hmm... I don't recall any e-mails from you...

BUT

It's great to hear from you!

I think I'm going to the Philadelphia Museum of Art this weekend. So I'll wave somewhere in Bucks county!

Pilgrimsarbour said...

Hi Carrie and James,

Hey! Most of my customers are in Bucks County! I live in Montgomery, though.

Hope you have a good time at the museum!

--PA

Carrie said...

James, glad to know you aren't ignoring me. I'm sad to say I have never been to the Museum of Art even though I have lived many years in the area. Somehow I don't think my kids would enjoy a visit now.

PA - I'm actually in Montgomery county also.

James Swan said...

Carrie-

The museum was interesting. They had an extensive collection of religious art.... a lot of Mary. It would be a good pilgrimage stop, but I don't think it's on Rome's list.

Overall, a nice museum. Worth a visit.

Reform said...

My question is for James Swan. I am trying to track a phrase from Luther that a roman catholic says he found in WA Tr 3, 75, n.° 2911a. Or maybe: D. Martin Luthers Werke, Tischreden, 6 t , Weimar 1912-21. The whole issue is a phrase that Luther says after the Peasants war.

James Swan said...

My question is for James Swan. I am trying to track a phrase from Luther that a roman catholic says he found in WA Tr 3, 75, n.° 2911a. Or maybe: D. Martin Luthers Werke, Tischreden, 6 t , Weimar 1912-21. The whole issue is a phrase that Luther says after the Peasants war.

I had this post finished in draft since last October, so I posted it for you. Here's WA Tr 3, 75, n.° 2911a. It's a shorter version of the quote found in my blog entry (2911b).